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Wellness and Your Best Friend 08/15/11

Paul Jacobson, Pet Food Nutritionist, asks the question: Have you ever thought about the impact that cheap foods and products have on your pets?


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Vegetarians and Vegans generally appreciate the wellness benefits that are derived from a greener and holistic life style. Vegans, in particular, aspire to a moral and ethical lifestyle. Wellness determines your mental and physical state. Wellness determines your longevity.

Informed and conscious individuals understand that a natural lifestyle, free of preservatives and chemicals, impacts positively on your well being.  The conscious consumer is moral, ethical and humane and they endeavour to work in co-operation with the world and earth. That same person applies logic when making purchases and challenges institutions that shamelessly and carelessly rely on marketing jargon to promote their wares, rather than presenting truth and facts.

What about our animals?

But, when it comes to the treatment of our companion animals, the same enlightened consumer does not necessarily apply the same and equal principles.

Almost all conscious consumers acknowledge the positive impact that a natural, wholesome and organic diet can have on health. Wholesome diets best preserve nutrients, minerals, vitamins and enzymes. Yet, when it comes to feeding our loving animals, we are happy to offer highly processed food that is laden with preservatives and synthetic digestives, colourants and flavourants.

It’s not just food

The enlightened consumer also understands the dangers of household products that contain chemicals and poisons and thus, gravitate towards products that are natural. However, when it comes to bathing our pets and protecting them from fleas and ticks, we unconditionally apply shampoos and repellents that may be harmful.

The skin is the largest eliminatory organ in the body, which is why skin and coat problems are often the first indicators of poor health and care. Yet, almost every pet suffers from some sort of skin condition. This clearly proves that we are doing something wrong. Even veterinarians are often lost when it comes to treating skin allergies. Treating with cortisone or changing to another flavour of food will not solve the problem in the long term.

In arriving at the right decision, the responsible pet owner and consumer must use logic, utilise the extensive literature that is available and of course understand the ingredients that are listed on labels and packaging.

When it comes to the health of your animals, you should apply the same standards you use for yourself.

[Update] Some useful resources:
‘Pet’ Foods and Animal Testing Policies
Dog Food Analysis
Veggie Pets
Vondis

Paul Jacobson is a Pet Food Nutritionist and qualified chef and owner of Vondis Holistic Pet Nutrition. Vondis has been producing natural pet food for 14 years and is a registered nutritional pet food. Vondis is actively involved in educating the public on the benefits of natural diets for pets and a holistic approach when treating them. Go to www.vondis.co.za for more information.

 

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Paul Jacobson is a Pet Food Nutritionist and qualified chef and owner of Vondis Holistic Pet Nutrition. www.vondis.co.za


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